Pocahontas County Bicentennial ~ 1821-2021

Historical Sketches of Pocahontas County – 1901
By William T. Price
Natural Features and Social Customs

In reference to the ancestry of our people:

It is noticeable that the predominating element, as to numbers, trace their ancestry to the north of Ireland, and are either Scotch Irish or English Irish. This is explained in this manner.

About 1611, there was a district in Ireland that was largely depopulated by forfeiture of lands when O’Neil of Tyronne was defeated. Puritans from England and Reformers from Scotland were induced to occupy the abandoned property. These persons in turn had to seek elsewhere a refuge from oppression when there came a change in Irish affairs. Having been Scotch or English people living for a time in Ireland, they were called Scotch-Irish. In common usage the term is applied to both English and Scotch, as the Scotch seem to have largely predominated.

About the time when on the lookout for a refuge, the Virginians wanted a living wall for protection against Indian raids from beyond the Blue Ridge. Now when it became known that Germans, Scotch-Irish, and French Hugenots were willing to settle on the frontier; liberal concessions were made by the Virginia colonial authorities, and it was not many years – 1732 to 1750 – a line of settlements were formed, and the desired living fortifications provided for. Therefore, in the course of fifteen or twenty years subsequent to 1740, the more inviting sections of the counties of Monroe, Greenbrier and Pocahontas were settled by a goodly people, inured to hardships and familiar with privations. These people had an experience of life along the frontier with its perilous emergencies for a period of thirty or more years of danger that developed strong intellectual vigor. These people placed the highest value on education, and though their advantages were limited, they made the very best of their opportunities.

The Scotch-Irish trend of religious belief gives a high tone to the human intellect and awakens the highest aspirations of Man’s spirit nature; thus these early settlers had, by inheritance, the highest religious standard and the highest civilization of their times…

BIOGRAPHIC
AARON MOORE

Aaron Moore, one of the older sons of Moses Moore, the pioneer, hunter and scout, after his marriage with Catherine Johnson, daughter of John Johnson, first lived near Frost; but the greater part of his life he dwelt on the west bank of the Greenbrier, four miles above Marlinton, where he had settled in the woods…

By arduous industry and judicious economy, Mr. and Mrs. Moore built up a prosperous home. Their sons were John, James, Samuel, Thomas, Andrew Jackson, Henry, William Daniel, and George Claiborne; and the daughters were Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine, Eliza, and Melinda – eight sons and five daughters.

John Moore married Jane, daughter of Colonel John Baxter, and settled in the woods near Marlinton…

James Moore married Anne McNeill, daughter of the late Squire John McNeill, on Dry Branch of Swago, and settled in the woods near Marlinton, on property now owned by John R. Moore…

Samuel Moore married Nancy Beale, and settled on the summit of Marlin Mountain, in the unbroken forest and killed ten rattlesnakes on the first acre cleared about his cabin… The farm opened up by Samuel Moore is visible from so many points that a lady from Florida called it a revolving farm.

William D. Moore settled on Elk Mountain in the woods. He was married three times…

Thomas Moore, a noted rail splitter and fence builder, never married. He opened up a nice farm on Back Alleghany, where he now resides.

Andrew Jackson Moore was married twice. First wife was Abigail McLaughlin, daughter of the late Major Daniel McLaughlin, near Greenbank… The second wife was Rachel, daughter of the late Charles Grimes, near Frost…

A. J. Moore settled in the woods on Back Alleghany, and opened up a fine farm.

Henry Moore married Elizabeth Auldridge, and settled in the woods near Driftwood, and opened up two nice farms…

George C. Moore married Rachel Duncan on Stony Creek…

Elizabeth Moore became Mrs. William Auldridge and settled near Indian Draft…

Catherine Moore was married to John Burr, and they settled in Burr Valley.

Eliza Moore became Mrs. Price McComb, and they settled in the woods on Cummings Creek…

Melinda Moore was the second wife of the late Captain William Cochran, on Stony Creek…

It is instructive to reflect on the memoirs of such a relationship, so largely composed of patient, industrious people, accomplishing what they have done in developing our county. Nine members of this family settled in the woods, and by their efforts more than a thousand acres of wilderness land has been made to rejoice and blossom as the rose…

It is not easy to appreciate what it cost – weary toil, wear and tear of muscle and bodily vigor – to achieve what they have. Nevertheless, the oldest people tell us that there was more real contentment and satisfaction and enjoyment in life then than now; for there was a felt community of interest, and harmonious help and truly sympathetic endeavor, that seemed to have a charm not apparent now…

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