Huntersville Historical Traditions president Tim Wade, right, accepts the deed for the Old Huntersville Cemetery from Bill Graham, Elder of Marlinton Presbyterian Church. L.D. Bennett photo

Laura Dean Bennett
Staff Writer

Bill Graham, Elder of Marlinton Presbyterian Church, presented a deed for the Old Huntersville Cemetery to Tim Wade, president of Huntersville Historical Traditions, Sunday at the grave of John Bradshaw.

Bradshaw was Huntersville’s first settler, an Indian spy and a Revolu- tionary War Veteran.

The lot, known as the Old Huntersville Cemetery was deeded to the Presbyterian Church in August 1850, and has been the property of the Presbytery of West Virginia since that time.

“We appreciate the generosity of the Marlinton Presbyterian Church for their part in helping us to become the owners of this piece of history,” Wade said as he received the deed.

“We intend to take care of this cemetery lot, honor those buried here and use it to educate residents and visitors about the history of Huntersville.”

Some members of the HHT committee hosted a picnic at the restored Huntersville Schoolhouse for folks from the Marlinton Church prior to the ceremony at the cemetery.

Huntersville Historical Traditions, a non-profit group founded in 2007, continues to preserve historical buildings and sites in Huntersville and celebrates the culture and traditions of 18th, 19th and 20th century Pocahontas County with its annual festival.

Huntersville Traditions Day will be held Friday and Saturday, October 4 and 5, with Friday evening’s activities – dinner, music, period dance, cakewalk and a pie auction – centered around the Huntersville Schoolhouse.

Inco-Check