Thursday, October 26, 1967

Tank Explodes

A tar tank exploded at the Green Bank State Road Garage last Tuesday, and Lee Dean and Ralph Good, of Hillsboro, suffered burns on their arms and faces. They were heating the tar to load their tank truck and had stopped to eat lunch, sitting in the truck, when the explosion occurred. It was quite an explosion, shattering windows some distance away. Mr. Dean is still in the hospital here. Mr. Good was allowed to go home.

Buy a Block

Work was started Monday on the school cafeteria building. Harry Hockenberry reports $3,800 (including some supplies) plus 1,500 blocks. Burns Motor Freight added 1,000 blocks, and Burruss Lumber Company donated 7,000 feet of lumber.

Wild Turkey

Gary Beverage, 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Beverage, of Dunmore, will probably never forget how he bagged his first wild turkey, the first, in fact, he had ever seen. On October 20, he took his dog and air rifle (.22 caliber) into the woods to hunt squirrels. The dog soon located a turkey and ran it by Gary who managed to fire a pellet through its head.

– – –

One hundred and seventeen turkeys have been killed and checked in in Pocahontas through Monday, October 23, according to Conservation Officer Covert Poling; also two deer killed by bow and arrow, one near Buckeye, and one in the Durbin area; both were killed by out of County hunters.

By Franz L. Pogge
The Fascinating
World of Insects

In 1871 Darwin, in the Descent of Man, wrote this about a small beetle: “If we could imagine the male chalcosoma, with its polished bronze coat of mail and its vast horns, magnified to the size of a horse or even a dog, it would be one of the most imposing animals in the world.”

All of us who have come in contact with nature have at one time or another marveled at the grace and beauty of various insects, have been amazed at the size, shape and coloration of these small wonders of life, have been astonished by the feats they perform,and questioned their many curious ways of living…

The female of the Chinese silkworm moth is capable, through special scent organs, to attract male moths at a distance of more than 10 miles. The sacred scarab has the habit of making balls from fresh manure, often as large as a small apple, and rolling them along the ground to a suitable burial site. The male rhinoceros dung beetle possesses a huge long curved horn on the top of its head which make it look just what the name implies. A particular African grasshopper can easily catch and kill a mouse; the giant waterbug can capture and devour a small snake.

The list of fascinating wonders is endless. There are insects that look like sticks or dead twigs, insects that have no eyes, insects that can live without oxygen for an extremely long period of time, insects… On and on we could go.

Some 1,000,000 species throughout the world have already been described – three times as many as there are in the rest of the animal kingdom.

Within 20 miles of Marlinton, some 8,000 to 10,000 species of insects may be found.


Mr. and Mrs. Orville Sheets, of Green Bank, announce the engagement of their daughter, Carolyn Kay, to Gary Joseph Bream, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Bream, of Gardners, Pennsylvania.


The children and grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin R. Dunbrack will honor them on their Golden Wedding Anniversary by observing Open House for their relatives and friends on Sunday, November 5, from two to seven o’clock p.m. at their residence on 908 Second Avenue, Marlinton.


Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hill, of Lobelia, will celebrate their Fifty-Fifth Wedding Anniversary with an Open House at their home on Sunday afternoon, October 29.


Born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Matheny, of Bartow, a daughter. The mother is the former Bonnie Hedrick.


Glenn Adkison, 69, of Renick; burial in the Greenbrier Memorial Gardens at Lewisburg.

Adam Blake, 34, was killed October 21 when a tractor overturned on him at Huttonsville. Born at Marlinton, a son of Beley Lane Blake, of Woodbridge, Virginia, and the late George Blake.

Burial in the Ruckman Cemetery