100-Years-Ago

Thursday,
November 2, 1916

A new ten cent piece has been coined by the government. On one side is the head of Liberty and on the other a bundle of rods in the center and a battle axe.
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Born to Mr. and Mrs. W. J. McCloud, near Warwick, October 25, a son. This is the eleventh child in this family, all living, five sons and six daughters, grandchildren of the late Dr. Irvine.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Cochran, October 31, 1916, a daughter.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Withers, October 31, 1916, twins, a son and a daughter.
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The post office at Nida, on the railway below Hosterman, has been established with A. V. Miller as postmaster.
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County Clerk S. L. Brown has received two unsigned applications for hunters’ license from residents of Cloverlick. One man is 66 years old, six feet, gray hair and dark eyes. The other is 37 years old, 5 feet 7 inches, black hair and eyes. If they will send in their names they will receive their licenses.
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Thurman Shoemaker, who lives with his grandparents, Rev. and Mrs. Ramsey, at Edray, had his arm broken Wednesday. At the afternoon recess while playing in the school house yard, he fell into a fence, another boy falling on him.
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French Moore had his collar bone and ribs severely injured in the football scrim- mage in the match game with Ronceverte Saturday.
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There will be a box supper at Mt. Zion church in the Hills on Saturday, November 11. Proceeds for the benefit of the church.
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W. E. Poage weighed 50 lambs raised by Charles Young at Buckeye, which tipped the scales at an even 4,600 pounds. These lambs were ranged in Buckley mountain. French Hoover’s Dorset lambs averaged better than 90 pounds.
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A hunting party killed a fine forked horn buck on Alleghany, near Rimel last week. A man from Clarksburg fired the lucky shot. Harry Sharp of Marlinton, was one of the party.

THE COUNTY
COMMISSIONER
In the campaign now closing, probably no candidacy has been more freely discussed by the voters than that for the honorable position of County Commissioner. This is altogether as it should be. No office in the county more vitally concerns the people generally. It is an office that requires good judgement, sound financial ideas, and the ability to work untiringly and enthusiastically for the advancement of the great cause of good roads, of which there is no greater problem confronting the people of the county and State.
It is easy for an untried man to promise much in the event of his election to this office, and thereby many are deceived. Dr. N. R. Price offers for re-election his record of performance during his term of office, and because he feels much remains to be done to round out his term of service as County Commissioner. It should be apparent to a majority of the voters that the experience gained in a six year term on the court would be of value in avoiding the expenditures and unwise enterprises into which the novice in county business affairs is often drawn.
The county commissioners are at all times surrounded by business inter- ests that know exactly what they want, and often get it, to the harm and detriment of the county…
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Report of Pine Grove School for first month, ending October 20. The average attendance was ninety-eight. This speaks well for the first month, but let us make it better all the time, especially work to bring up punctuality.
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Mrs. Huldah Wooddell died Saturday, October 21, 1916, of pneumonia. Funeral services were conducted in the Arbovale church on Sunday afternoon by her pastor, Rev. L. A. Kelley, assisted by Rev. J. Blackhurst, and she was laid to rest in the Arbovale cemetery. Mrs. Wooddell was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, a devoted wife, a loving mother and a kind, helpful neighbor and friend, and was always willing and glad to render any assistance she could to those who needed her services in sickness. She leaves a husband, a son and daughter and a host of friends and relatives to mourn her departure.
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The many friends of Harry Baxter were shocked to hear of his untimely death on Monday morning, October 30, 1916, at Laurel Bank, on Elk, after a short illness of diptheria. For a few days, he had been suffering with tonsillitis and on Sunday diptheria developed with fatal results. He was in his twenty-fifth year. The deceased was one of our most promising young men. He was popular and well liked by all who knew him, a universal favorite of the family. He was able, industrious and attentive to business…
Deep sympathy is felt for the whole family in this great sorrow and in a special way for his wife and bride. In their short life together, they were one indeed, loving each other as only those who ar properly mated can. We cannot understand why the shadow should come so soon after the sunshine but God knows and he holds the helm. We can walk by faith where we cannot see, with the assurane that sometime we shall understand.

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