Worth ‘motivates volunteers’ at Lions Club conference

Former Pocahontas County resident Wayne Worth, who now resides in Clarksburg, gives a presentation at the annual Lions Club International Leadership Conference in Morgantown. Worth provided information to Lions on how to motivate volunteers. S. Stewart photo
Former Pocahontas County resident Wayne Worth, who now resides in Clarksburg, gives a presentation at the annual Lions Club International Leadership Conference in Morgantown. Worth provided information to Lions on how to motivate volunteers. S. Stewart photo

Suzanne Stewart
Staff Writer
 
Lions Club International members from all over West Virginia – and a few neighboring states – attended the annual Leadership Conference at Lakeview Resort in Morgantown last weekend.

Several seminars were offered, including one by former Pocahontas County resident Wayne Worth, who is now president and treasurer of the Adamston Lions Club.

Worth presented a seminar titled “Motivating Volunteers,” a feat he has perfected in his years of service.

To motivate volunteers, Worth said it is important to share personal stories and explain why it is important to give your time and effort to help others. 

Worth shared stories of how he brought together volunteers from all over the state to assist in clean-up efforts after the devastating flood last summer. Two days after the flood swept through, Worth and a band of volunteers were in Clendenin, shoveling out mud and trying to salvage what they could.

Despite being a full-time social worker, Worth found time to go to Clendenin each Sunday and continues to join volunteers in the area to help residents rebuild. 

Through the years, Worth has piloted several programs in Harrison County which has brought together not only Lions Club members, but volunteers of all kinds.

In his presentation, Worth talked about a new initiative he started seven weeks ago called Neighbors in Action: Harrison County,  a drug prevention and awareness project. 

Each Saturday, Worth and community volunteers go door-to-door in Harrison County, passing out flyers with information for addicts and families or friends of individuals with a drug addiction. The flyers include phone numbers of rehabilitation centers, anonymous support groups and more.

Since the beginning of the program, Worth said he has been contacted by several individuals who have either entered detox or have taken steps to kick their habit.

Worth explained that the easiest way to get the word out to potential volunteers is through social media. He uses Facebook daily to update people on where and when to meet to serve the community.

He shared several videos he made during the clean-up in Clendenin. Those videos received thousands of views. Volunteers lined up to help, whether it was gathering supplies or showing up to help clean.

One individual, who traveled seven hours round trip once a week to help in Clendenin, summed it up best in one of Worth’s videos when he asked her why she volunteered.

“I can, so I should,” she said.

Worth concluded his presentation by saying that being a volunteer doesn’t just serve the community, it helps build lifelong relationships.

Pocahontas County Lions attending the conference were Larry and Phyliss Lucas of the Marlinton Lions Club and Charles Sheets, Linda Stewart and Suzanne Stewart of the Durbin Lions Club.

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