Pocahontas County weathers the storm

The sun came out Friday morning, and the all too familiar clean-up began.

Compared to neighboring counties, Pocahontas County was fortunate. Rainfall amounts were reported to be in the six inch range, as compared to ten inches in other areas of the state.

Small stream flooding, downed trees, mudslides and washed out road berms caused problems for the West Virginia Department of Highways, as well as for residents.

The rising waters of Stony Creek caused mayhem north of Marlinton as it flooded the roadway, the West Virginia Department of Highways and required the evacuation of Campbelltown.
The rising waters of Stony Creek caused mayhem north of Marlinton as it flooded the roadway, the West Virginia Department of Highways office and garage and required the evacuation of Campbelltown. Photo courtesy of Jaclyn Hollandsworth

Phone outages and power outages affected several areas of the county, and power outages will continue to be a problem though the beginning of the weekend.

Swago Creek at Buckeye broke over the bridge at Rt. 219, spilling out onto the highway and adjacent fields. Photo courtesy of Andria O'Brien.
Swago Creek at Buckeye broke over the bridge at Rt. 219, spilling out onto the highway and adjacent fields. Photo courtesy of Andria O’Brien.

Early reports Thursday evening indicated that no flooding was expected on the Greenbrier River. That was later changed to a crest of 10.3 feet, just a hair above flood stage.

Road washed out on Rt. 66 past entrance to Snowshoe Drive. Photo courtesy of Mandy Weese
Road washed out on Rt. 66 past entrance to Snowshoe Drive. Photo courtesy of Mandy Weese

The crest was adjusted to 15 feet late last night, but, fortunate again, the river crested at 12 feet just before midnight.

Main Street was spared.
Main Street was spared.

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