Q. What year were Hillsboro, Marlinton and Green Bank high schools consolidated into Pocahontas County High School.
A. 1970
Q. Where was the highest Confederate campground in the Civil War located in Pocahontas County.
A. Top of Allegheny.

Historical Sketches of Pocahontas County – 1901
By William T. Price
Natural Features and Social Customs

As to what we may owe the Persians, it may seem that it could not be very much, as the Persians were not a very inventive people, and the most of their vaunted wisdom they chiefly learned from their neighbors, the Assyrians and Babylonians. Nevertheless, we owe them something in a way they never intended.

We ought to thank the Persians from our inmost hearts for allowing themselves to be defeated so disastrously at the battle of Marathon. It is enough to make one shudder to consider what the world would have come to had the Persians conquered the Greeks and destroyed that people. So far as we can see from our point of view, had the Persians been victorious at Marathon, Greeks, Romans, Saxons, Anglo-Saxons and American people would have been Parsees; or Fire Worshippers.

Another thing to be remembered that we owe to the Persians is the relation or ratio of silver to gold in our bimetallic currency. This relation was, no doubt, first arranged in Babylonia, as the talent was divided into sixty mina, and the mina into sixty shekels, the sexagesimal system being applied to money as well as time. This system may owe its popularity to the fact that sixty has more divisors than most other numbers. This bimetallic arrangement of 13 to 1 assumed its practical and historical importance in Persian financial affairs, and spread from them to the Greek colonies in Asia and from there to America, where it has maintained itself with slight variations down to the recent past.


This paper is prepared to pay a tribute to the memory of a pioneer citizen of our county, the late David Hannah, of the Old Field Branch of Elk. He was a son of David Hannah, Senior, who was the progenitor of the Hannah Family, one of the oldest in Pocahontas.

David Hannah, Junior, the subject of his article, married Margaret Burnsides, on the Greenbrier, east of Hillsboro, a daughter of John Burnsides and his wife, Mary Walker, of Augusta County…

The writer remembers the personality of the venerable pioneer very vividly. In early youth I saw him frequently, and he was very interesting to me from the fact Mr. Hannah had been off to the War of 1812. To me an old soldier seemed more than human. He had an interesting way of relating his adventures, and was fond of talking about the war. He was at his best when telling how he felt when roused one morning before daybreak to get ready for an attack, as the British were reported as coming. He arose and put on his accoutrements quickly as possible, and took his place in the ranks and moved off to fight. His hat kept falling off as he marched until it became so troublesome that he was determined to find out the reason why it would not stay on his head. It had never been so hard to keep on before, because it was a good fit. When the troops halted, he examined his head and found the hairs were all on end, stiff as bristles, and were pushing the hat off as fast as he could put it on. The hair kept stiff until the order was given to return to camp, when it all became limber enough, and the hat was no more trouble. He found out afterwards that the whole scheme was to try the new soldiers to find out how they would conduct themselves when ordered into battle. This was near Norfolk…

The old soldier worked hard in building up his home, and the privations he and his family had to endure would seem unbearable now. He was kind and hospitable to a fault, ready to share the last he had with the visitor that might desire shelter and food. He was much esteemed by all of his acquaintances.

Finally the end came. One of the prettiest places near his home was selected and they placed him to sleep under the green sod that his own hands had helped to clear away.