Patience/Patients

There is an old saying, “Do as I say and not as I do.”

Guess what.

For years as a nurse, I gave out advice. Now the shoe is on the other foot – mine!

I recently fell and broke a bone in my left foot. The E. R. doctor recommended crutches.

No kidding?

Was he trying to kill me?

No. He was just giving me advice, which I refused.

So they put on a very heavy, clumsy boot, with lots of straps, which would be hard enough for a person with good vision – which I don’t have – to figure out.

I’ve heard that doctors do not make good patients, and in my case, neither do nurses!

I retired my “hiking stick” and, thanks to a friend, I’m using a borrowed four-prong cane. It is much easier to manage than the crutches.

I had a follow-up with the orthopedist, and she gave that heavy boot “the boot.”

Wearing a special shoe is much more comfortable, less painful and I’m not nearly as grumpy.

I recently attended a birthday party for the three year old daughter of some friends.

She looked down at my shoes and informed me that they did not match.

I believe we should have matching shoes when we injure one foot. Walking with one shoe higher than the other causes you to be unbalanced. But – no matching boots, thank you very much.

Now, two months have passed, and the x-ray revealed that my foot has healed, but, sad to say, arthritis has come to visit my left knee. I hope it is only a visit, and that it is not here to stay.

This experience brought new people into my life.

Dr. Griffith and staff are compassionate, caring people. They do the profession proud.

They took time to listen and talk, and treated me like an individual and not just a name on the computer.

Hugs were exchanged, as well as an invitation to “drop in to visit when in the area.”

The personal touch has been lost in recent years.

I’m glad I found it in their office.