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100 Years Ago

Thursday, February 19, 1920

What is the answer?

Herbert Hoover.

He is the Topsy of politics. He just growed.

The man and the hour have come.

We have tried our best to reason out the great wave that passed over and enveloped the country when his name was mentioned for the Presidency, and it seems that he has nothing to recommend him except his ability. It seems that he is one of those men who can take hold and do things. He lays off the work and thinks ahead and presently everything is running smoothly and the job is done. His is a quiet sort of efficiency…

The country must have sensed the inability of Congress to get anything done. That important branch of government jabbers like they belong to the monkey tribe, but they do not seem able to get anything done.

It became apparent that it would be a mistake to put a cultivated gentleman at the head of the government at a time that Congress was on a dead center…

There may be some truth in the complaint that Congress is manned by lawyers whose business it is to talk and to bewilder. They say that they do not mind having the lawyers represented in that body but they are getting most woefully tired of having nearly all of them lawyers.

What they want is a good executive.

That is a mouthful of a word, and we all know what it means better than we can tell it. It refers to a man that has to get work out of other men, thus a man may be a good workman and a poor executive. They, the men with executive faculties, are found in every walk of life, from mule driver to President. Hamilton was so impressed with the need of a vigorous executive as the head of the American government that he favored a plan by which the President was to hold office until impeached. That is, he was in for life unless he was fired by the powers of Congress. And when you think of it, that is exactly the way the term of office of a president of a great corporation is terminated.

Most of the great executives are running farms for it takes careful planning and good foresight to conduct a well regulated farm through the vicissitudes of the changing seasons. This is probably the reason that the farmer is the solid dependable foundation of a free government. For instance, we have known more farmers than any other class, but we have never seen a farmer who was the least bit tainted with Socialism…

But farmers do not stand in line for such a place as that of President of the United States…. They have no time to flit hither and yon, from one political convention to another, and go boozing around with the boys, and get known throughout the land.

The responsible nature of their engagements keeps them at home, and the farm functions and feeds the world…

REMEDY

The family physician prescribed the homely remedy of a pint of cider vinegar and a tablespoon full of cayenne pepper, sweetened to taste, as a possible preventative of the flu for a Marlinton man last week. It was to be taken in broken doses, but the patient thinking that enough was aplenty took the whole pint at one dose. The doctor was called back on the third day to break the sweat which had been continuous. The man feels that he is immune.

DIED

Rice King died at his home at Droop Siding Monday, February, 16, 1920, aged about 35 years, of pneumonia, following influenza. He is survived by his wife and their three children.

Elliott Houdyshell died Friday night, February 13, 1920, of pneumonia, following influenza and measles. He was the son of Irvine Houdyshell, who died last week, and his age was 18 years. Burial at Frost…

Miss Eula Hill, aged fifteen years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alpheus W. Hill, died at her home at Marlinton Friday night, February 13, 1920, of pneumonia and influenza. Her father, mother and five sisters are all desperately sick with the same dread diseases. Burial in the family plot at Lobelia…

Mrs. Ridgeway, a nurse who came from Monroe county to attend Mrs. Bird, died at the home of Squire Uriah Bird last Friday, of heart disease following an attack of influenza. Her body was taken to her home near Union for burial.

Mrs. Hildreth Beverage Dever, wife of Earl Dever, died at her home in Akron, Ohio, February 15, 1920. Her body arrived here Wednesday and was taken to Knapps Creek for burial. She was a daughter of Squire Coe Beverage…

Mrs. Branch Beal died at her home at Longdale, Virginia, February 15, 1920, of influenza, aged about 68 years. Burial on Elk on Tuesday… She was a daughter of the late John Shelton.

Died, Mrs. G. E. Moore February 13, 1920, and G. E. Moore, February 14, 1920, at their home in Staunton, Virginia, of influenza. They are survived by two children ages three and five years… Mr. Moore was a section foreman on the C & O and a brother of A. S. and D. C. Moore, of Marlinton…

Miss Opal McComb died at her home at Huntersville Tuesday, February 17, 1920, of tuberculosis, aged about 23 years. She was the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry McComb…

Mrs. Rufus Louk died at her home on upper Camden avenue in Marlinton Tuesday, February 17, 1920, of influenza. She is survived by her husband and a number of children. Her body was taken to Linwood for burial.

Mrs. Lydia M. Hill, wife of Joel R. Hill, of Lobelia, died at the home of her son, Fred Hill, on the morning of January 29, 1920, after a lingering illness of more than a year’s duration of rheumatism and other complications. Burial in the Hill graveyard…

May God comfort all the bereaved ones.

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