Published On: Wed, Jun 4th, 2014

Keeping the tradition alive

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100_1869Thirteen-year-old Trevor Lee Hammons, of Marlinton, took the fourth place award in the 59-year-old and younger “Old-Time Banjo” contest at the 38th Annual Vandalia Gathering May 25.

Trevor is the son of Trampas and Teresa Hammons and the great-grandson of the late Lee Hammons. He has been playing old-time music for nearly five years.

He very much appreciates his teacher, Pam Lund, and Ruth Randall for their help and encouragement. They have helped to pass on a great tradition.

The Vandalia Gathering is held during Memorial Day weekend each year in Charleston. The grounds of the state capitol come alive with old-time traditional Appalachian music, dancing, arts and crafts and food.

Contests are held each day for different categories, showcasing the old-time ways and a simpler time.

The West Virginia Division of Culture and History keeps and records all of this history for the state’s records. The awards and records are stored at the capitol and around the world in libraries for everyone to access. The best performers of old-time music from all over the world attend this festival and show off their talents for all to enjoy.

Trevor received his first award three years ago at the First Annual Fiddler’s Convention held in Monterey, Virginia. In August 2013, he appeared on stage again at Clifftop at the 24th Appalachian String Band Music Festival and placed second in the Youth Old-Time Banjo Contest.

Trevor plans to keep playing old-time music and hopes to be able to teach it to others someday.

He plays the banjo for the Young and Restless Pickers, a group of Lund’s students.

You can catch their show at the Marlinton Motor Inn on Friday nights. Watch for dates in the Marlinton Motor Inn ad on page 2 of The Pocahontas Times.

About the Author

- The Pocahontas Times can be contacted at 304-799-4973 or e-mail Jaynell Graham at jsgraham@pocahontastimes.com