Published On: Wed, Feb 1st, 2017

Fifty Years Ago

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Thursday, February 2, 1967

Eugene Dunbrack makes regular trips to Chicago with loads of leather from the tannery here. Last week he was starting his return trip and got stranded in the 24-inch snowfall in Chicago. He arrived home Monday, four days later. He luckily had some Ritz crackers and cheese spread. Someone brought hot coffee along to the stranded motorists, and a truly Good Samaritan took Mr. Dunbrack to his home for a much appreciated breakfast of eggs.
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The First National Bank recently purchased the two old Southern States Buildings. The one next to the alley is being torn down and the lot will be paved and used as a parking lot for the bank customers, employees and tenants. The second building will be remodeled. The back part will be used for storing bank supplies and the front will be rented for a store. The empty lot between it and Williams Supply will be filled and paved as a parking lot for store customers.

Donation

On January 21, 1967, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory donated to the town of Hillsboro a Seagraves fire truck to help Hillsboro establish a fire department.

The fire truck pumper is capable of pumping water through three, two and one-half inch hoses at the rate of 750 gallons per hose. When a local water supply is not available for the pumper, water can be pumped from the fire truck’s 1,100 gallon booster tank. Hillsboro, of which Graham H. LaRue is Mayor, was incorporated in 1886. The town has about 70 residences, several business places, a high school, grade school, Vo-Ag building, gymnasium and two churches. The population is about 210. All these years, Hillsboro has had to rely on the Marlinton Volunteer Fire Department, which has to travel 10 miles over mountain roads, but always arrives on the scene promptly. In the past few years, three large residences and one large barn have burned to the ground and it is now hoped this truck can contain a fire until the Marlinton Department can get to the scene. The Town council is making plans to build a small building to house the truck and provide a place for council meetings.

GROUNDHOGS

The nice weather brought the groundhogs out early Tuesday. William Akers was going up Price Hill and saw two groundhogs fighting on top of the bank above the road. They were probably arguing about which day is Groundhog Day. They rolled over the hill into the road and he caught them both alive.

Star Farmer

Norman Alderman, Jr., of the Marlinton FFA Chapter, was chosen Chapter Star Farmer for 1966. Norman is a sophomore in high school and is vice president of his FFA Chapter. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Alderman, Sr., of Huntersville. For this honor Norman will receive a ten dollar award from the State Department of Agriculture which will be presented to him at a later date.

Old Paper

Henry McNeel several months ago brought in an old newspaper, Weekly Argus, published in Albany, dated July 13, 1844. There was also a daily and semi-weekly edition. This paper seemed to be a summary of “the six daily papers.” In the agricultural column, better breeding animals were suggested as the best way to improve stock. The political news concerned the candidacy of Democrat James K. Polk and Whig Henry Clay. Riots were reported from Philadelphia between the “Roman Catholics (Irish) and the Native Americans.” There were delayed reports of the Great Flood on the Mississippi in June.

GIRL SCOUTS

On January 23, “Gelobet,” a German 3-part sacred round was taught to the troop by sister scouts, Krystal Simmons and Marzella Hollandsworth.

Ginny Mitchell was acting Scout-in-Charge for the Eagle Patrol’s presentation of the Flag Ceremony. Sarah Howard gave a touching poem about our feathered friend, the duck…

BIRTHS

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Roy, of Marlinton, a daughter, named Ronda Lee.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. James Riley, of Arbovale, a son. The mother is the former Alice Davis.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Taylor, of Richmond, Virginia, a son, named Stephen Warren. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Taylor, of Dunmore.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hevener, of Clearwater, Wisconsin, a daughter named Anne Elizabeth.

DEATHS

Rev. Roland Henry Skaggs, aged 91, of Marlinton; burial in Mountain View Cemetery.
Mack Henry Duffy, 71, of Dunmore; burial in the Hickman Cemetery at Dyer.
Mrs. Nancy Cochran Drummond, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; a daughter of the late L. S. and Effie Cochran. Burial in the Mount Meriah Cemetery.
Mrs. Billee S. Hamrick, 73, of Beard; a daughter of the late E. F. and Addie Stapleton. Burial in McWright Cemetery north of Green-ville, Texas.

About the Author

- The Pocahontas Times can be contacted at 304-799-4973 or e-mail Jaynell Graham at jsgraham@pocahontastimes.com. For website questions please contact Chris Kincaid at chris@pocahontastimes.com