Published On: Wed, Jun 4th, 2014

100-Years-Ago

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Thursday, June 4, 1914

Sheriff Cochran arrested Clifford Snyder on Elk Saturday. Snyder was given a jail sentence last court, and when put to work on the roads, ran away some three weeks ago. The sheriff learned of his whereabouts and fetched him back. Snyder will have to make up the time he lost with several months added for running off.

The house of Mrs. S. A. Dixon, on Cummings Creek, near Huntersville, was burned  with all its contents, at noon last Thursday. At the time no one was in the house except a young lady, and the origin of the fire is somewhat of a mystery, as there had been no fire in the stoves since early morning. About one hundred dollars in currency belonging to various members of the family was burned.

The oil on the streets of this town has greatly alleviated the misery of town life in the dusty season and has saved the merchants thousands of dollars in saving their goods from damage.

A case or two of smallpox has developed in Durbin, but strict precautionary measures have been taken and nothing in the way of epidemic is feared.

Mrs. Mary Fertig, an aged lady living in the Hills near Mt. Zion, while descending the stairway in her home, at a late hour Monday night, fell and fractured her right leg at the hip, a very serious injury.

An Italian and an Austrian were arrested on Elk last Sunday for selling whiskey.

Clabe Smith and Jim Prine, prisoners on the chain gang, working on the concrete walk about the courthouse, ran off yesterday afternoon. The guard, Frank Sparks, could go in but one direction, so he had  to let Smith go but he brought back Prine. Smith was under sentence for boot legging, and Prine awaits trial on a like charge.

 

LEG BROKEN

H. W. Sloan, of Norfolk, Va., had his leg broken Wednesday morning by jumping from a buggy when the horse scared at an automobile at the Hamilton field east of the courthouse. He and U. H. Johnson, of Philadelphia, were driving a horse owned by James Cash of Mt. Grove. The horse is automobile shy, and when approached by E. M. Arbogast’s car, it began to plunge. Sloan jumped out and broke his leg. He is now at the Marlinton Hotel. Johnson stayed in and managed to hold the horse until O. E. Mc-Keever came to his assistance. On the day before the same horse reared and hurt Mr. Johnson’s arm severely.

 

HORSE’S JAW BROKEN

Dr. Yeager’s riding horse broke his jaw in a peculiar way Sunday afternoon. The horse was tied near the doctor’s residence with a short rein and a strong bridle, and when found his jaw was broken on both sides. The horse was in the habit of breaking loose, and it is supposed that it plunged and getting caught in a twist with the heavy curb and strong bridle, the jaw was broken in this way.

 

 BADLY SCALDED

Conover, N.C. May 26 – A sad accident occurred to Mrs. W. A. Grogg here this morning, Tuesday. While washing clothes the boiling suds overflowed, scalding her very badly on the face, arms and foot. She in now in a critical condition, but there is hope of her recovery. It is feared she will lose one eye. Mrs. Grogg has many friends and relatives in Pocahontas who hope for her speedy recovery.

 

THOMAS CREEK

Albert Perry has postponed his cross tie job for the present and is digging a well.

Delbert and Clyde Carpenter and Joe McLaughlin have gone to Elk River to work, and Edgar Carpenter has gone to Deer Creek.

We think that the Greenbank District ought to purchase a rock crusher as there is plenty of rock in the road that needs crushing.

Dogs got among Albert Perry’s sheep a few days ago and tore some of them pretty badly but did not kill any.

Forrest, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sharp, is very sick.

L. L. Gragg is assisting Chas. Shinaberry in selling and delivering churn dashers and washing machines through this section this week.

 

ARBOVALE

O. G. Arbogast is conducting a singing school at Stony Bottom.

Wm. Malcom set up a fine monument for James F. Sutton in the Arbovale cemetery last week.

Luther Flynn expects to leave Wednesday for Shepherdstown to attend commencement.

 

LOCAL MENTION

S. P. Landis was at this office Monday. He reports his brother Henry in very poor health at this time.

Fighting Jack McDonald was in town Sunday on his way to Elk to take charge of a camp for the Spruce Lumber Company.

G. W. Fuller, of Academy, was in town Monday. He says he has over thirteen hundred white Leghorn chicks so far this season.

E. H. Beard and Dr. Eskridge, of Academy, were in town Sunday on their way to Edray to attend a Sunday School conference.

Mrs. Ira Brill and little daughter, Margaret, and Miss Marjorie Moore left today for a month’s visit to relatives in Lynchburg and Roanoke.

Captain Swecker was in town Tuesday to cry the sale of the camp outfit of the Campbell Lumber Company. He reports a very successful sale.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hiner, at Sunset, June 2, a son.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Emory Miller, at Onoto, May 27, a son.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Adam Irvine, of Warwick, May 30, a son.

 

The gentleman who carried off the fountain pen from the post office last Saturday will please return the same, if it is not too much trouble.

S. P. Landis was at this office Monday. He reports his brother Henry in very poor health at this time.

Fighting Jack McDonald was in town Sunday on his way to Elk to take charge of a camp for the Spruce Lumber Company.

G. W. Fuller, of Academy, was in town Monday. He says he has over thirteen hundred white Leghorn chicks so far this season.

E. H. Beard and Dr. Eskridge, of Academy, were in town Sunday on their way to Edray to attend a Sunday School conference.

Mrs. Ira Brill and little daughter, Margaret, and Miss Marjorie Moore left today for a month’s visit to relatives in Lynchburg and Roanoke.

Captain Swecker was in town Tuesday to cry the sale of the camp outfit of the Campbell Lumber Company. He reports a very successful sale.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hiner, at Sunset, June 2, a son.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Emory Miller, at Onoto, May 27, a son.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Adam Irvine, of Warwick, May 30, a son.

 

The gentleman who carried off the fountain pen from the post office last Saturday will please return the same, if it is not too much trouble.

About the Author

- The Pocahontas Times can be contacted at 304-799-4973 or e-mail Jaynell Graham at jsgraham@pocahontastimes.com